Best of #HealthPolicyValentines 2017

I often share how social media can develop a sense of community. That causes can be brought together through a hashtag or like minded individuals can tackle problems via a twitter chat.  This is a good example of a community coming together on twitter to share concerns and also have a little fun.

#HealthPolicyValentine was formed to “send love” to their favorite health policy change.  If I am recalling correctly, it was started last year by Emma Sandoe on twitter. She got the ball rolling again this year…

I am sure people would love to send Martin Shkreli some “love”. He was the person responsible for the now infamous price hike of the EpiPen. With the incoming Trump administration there was a lot of anxiety about the Affordable Care Act…

But also there was hope and solutions proposed…

 

The creativity was also wonderful…

 

This hashtag not only brings out some fun things but creates an ongoing dialogue. It also creates a running list of people who are knowledgeable and passionate about healthcare policy. I collected more of my favorites in the below Storify. Please enjoy the laughter but also the sense of community and passion around improving healthcare policy…

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Blogging On Suicide: A Resource


Suicide is a tragically common event. Behind every death by suicide is a story and it’s often a story that needs to be told. How the story is told matters. Some headlines in newspapers are not always friendly. They are often stigmatizing and sensationalized. Others have published ReportingOnSuicide.org to provide guidance to journalists.

In the blogging community we have the unique opportunity to use our organic reach to tell the stories that matter to us. How we use words around suicide can have an impact. Bloggers have a voice to be a force for positive change.

From the social work perspective I had the privilege of writing “Let’s Talk About Suicide: #LanguageMatters” with Dr. Jonathan Singer. We reviewed how words around suicide can effect clinical care. The simplest example I can give is saying that one does not “commit” suicide, somebody “dies by suicide”.  Committing suicide further stigmatizes and criminalizes the act.  This matters not only on a one to one level but a larger level. The media and social media also needs to measure their response to suicide. That language and how stories are crafted can have both a negative and positive impact on our audience.

BloggingOnSuicide.Org provides another unique perspective for those who generate their own content from the ground up.  Suicide Awareness Voices of Education have created this wonderful document that not only focuses on language but focuses on critical questions to ask before and after publication. If you are a blogger that has or will write about suicide, please click on the image below to view the resource.  As bloggers we have a unique opportunity to change how stories about suicide are told…

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